INSTRUMENT PERFORMANCE IN KEPLER's FIRST MONTHS

@article{Caldwell2010INSTRUMENTPI,
  title={INSTRUMENT PERFORMANCE IN KEPLER's FIRST MONTHS},
  author={Douglas A. Caldwell and Jeffery J. Kolodziejczak and Jeffrey Edward van Cleve and Jon M. Jenkins and Paul R. Gazis and Vic S. Argabright and E. E. Bachtell and Edward Wood Dunham and John Charles Geary and Ronald L. Gilliland and Hema Chandrasekaran and Jie Li and Peter Tenenbaum and Hayley Wu and William J. Borucki and Stephen T. Bryson and Jessie L. Dotson and Michael R. Haas and David G. Koch},
  journal={The Astrophysical Journal},
  year={2010},
  volume={713}
}
The Kepler Mission relies on precise differential photometry to detect the 80 parts per million (ppm) signal from an Earth-Sun equivalent transit. Such precision requires superb instrument stability on timescales up to ~2 days and systematic error removal to better than 20 ppm. To this end, the spacecraft and photometer underwent 67 days of commissioning, which included several data sets taken to characterize the photometer performance. Because Kepler has no shutter, we took a series of dark… 

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Kepler mission highlights
  • W. Borucki, D. Koch
  • Physics, Geology
    Proceedings of the International Astronomical Union
  • 2010
Abstract During the first 33.5 days of science-mode operation of the Kepler Mission, the stellar flux of 156,000 stars were observed continuously. The data show the presence of more than 1800
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