INFLUENCES OF INTRODUCED PLAGUE ON NORTH AMERICAN MAMMALS: IMPLICATIONS FROM ECOLOGY OF PLAGUE IN ASIA

@inproceedings{Biggins2001INFLUENCESOI,
  title={INFLUENCES OF INTRODUCED PLAGUE ON NORTH AMERICAN MAMMALS: IMPLICATIONS FROM ECOLOGY OF PLAGUE IN ASIA},
  author={Dean E. Biggins and Michael Y. Kosoy},
  year={2001}
}
Abstract Intercontinental movements of invasive species continue to modify the world's ecosystems. The plague bacterium (Yersinia pestis) has colonized and altered animal communities worldwide but has received much more attention as a human pathogen. We reviewed studies on the ecology of Y. pestis in ancient foci of central Asia and in western North America, where the bacterium apparently has become established much more recently. Although rodent populations on both continents are affected… Expand
Symposium on the ecology of plague and its effects on wildlife: a model for translational research.
TLDR
It is paradoxical that despite detailed knowledge of how the plague bacterium kills its hosts the authors know relatively little about how plague, as an exotic invader with a potentially large host range, has influenced wildlife in its native or introduced range. Expand
Rodent–Pika Parasite Spillover in Western North America
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Examination of historical and contemporary records of fleas on pikas from sites at different elevations in the Sierra Nevada and Rocky Mountains and the Pacific Northwest provides evidence that rodents and pika interact enough to allow considerable parasite spillover, and which could be exacerbated as pikAs are increasingly stressed by climate change at lower elevations some rodent species expand up-elevation in the face of increasing global warming. Expand
Plague Exposure in Mammalian Wildlife Across the Western United States
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Large-scale data set that details the extent of Y. pestis exposure in wildlife, combined with recent advances in understanding of pathogen ecology, offer a clearer picture of zoonotic pathogens and the risks they pose. Expand
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Results indicate that plague infections occur under circumstances distinct from the broader ecological distribution of hosts, and that plague-infected niches are similar among hosts; hence, evidence coincides with the predictions of the Plague Niche Hypothesis, and contrasts with those of the Host Nichehypothesis. Expand
INTERSPECIFIC COMPARISONS OF SYLVATIC PLAGUE IN PRAIRIE DOGS
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Major effects of plague are to reduce colony size of black-tailed prairie dogs and increase intercolony distances within colony complexes and epidemiologic concepts are used to support an enzootic hypothesis in which the disease is maintained in a dynamic state. Expand
Linking Zoonosis Emergence to Farmland Invasion by Fluctuating Herbivores: Common Vole Populations and Tularemia Outbreaks in NW Spain
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A decade of research on the colonization of farming environments in NW Spain by common voles (Microtus arvalis) and its public health impacts, specifically periodic tularemia outbreaks in humans is reviewed. Expand
Plague dynamics are driven by climate variation
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Using field data from 1949–1995 and previously undescribed statistical techniques, it is shown that Y. pestis prevalence in gerbils increases with warmer springs and wetter summers, and threat of outbreaks may be increasing where humans live in close contact with rodents and fleas harboring endemic plague. Expand
Prairie dog presence affects occurrence patterns of disease vectors on small mammals
Wildlife disease is recognized as a burgeoning threat to imperiled species and aspects of host and vector community ecology have been shown to have significant effects on disease dynamics. TheExpand
Plague bacterium as a transformer species in prairie dogs and the grasslands of western North America.
  • D. A. Eads, D. Biggins
  • Geography, Medicine
  • Conservation biology : the journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
  • 2015
TLDR
The transformer species concept was applied to the plague bacterium Yersinia pestis in western North America, where the pathogen was introduced around 1900 and causes trophic-level perturbations that affect the stability of ecosystems. Expand
Zoonoses As Ecological Entities: A Case Review of Plague
TLDR
Plague is at risk of becoming a public health problem in poor countries where ecosystem erosion, anthropic invasion of new areas, and climate change increase the contact of the population with reservoir systems, giving new urgency for ecologic research that further details its maintenance in the wild, the spillover events, and how it links to human cases. Expand
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