INFLUENCE OF MATERNAL MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES ON THE MUCOSAL MICROBIOME OF NEONATAL PIGS. Maradiaga,

Abstract

Colostrum is vital to the newborn pig. Hence, cross-fostering is employed to equalize the number of piglet between litters ensuring colostrum intake for their survival and growth. However, little is known about its impact on the intestinal microbiome of the neonatal pig. Twenty-four piglets were enrolled in the study to determine the influence of maternal microbial communities on the mucosal microbiome of the young pig. Piglets were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatments according to colostrum source and postcolostral milk feeding for 21 days, as follow: treatment 1 (n = 8), received colostrum and post-colostral milk feeding from their own dam; treatment 2 (n = 8), received colostrum from foster dam and returned to their own dam for post-colostral milk feeding; and treatment 3 (n = 8), received colostrum and post-colostral milk feeding from foster dam. DNA was extracted from nasal, fecal, and gastrointestinal (GI) tract of the piglets and from colostrum, vaginal, and fecal samples of the sows. Discriminant analysis revealed that bacterial communities varied with biogeographical location in the GI tract, with colon being the most diverse section. Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes were the dominant phyla in the GI tract of the young pig. Bacterial communities in both maternal colostrum and vaginal samples were significantly associated with those present in the GI tract, feces, and nasal passage of piglets. Treatment did not affect bacterial communities present in the piglet GI tract, however, the bacterial communities present in piglet fecal and nasal samples changed over time. Although

Cite this paper

@inproceedings{Nidia2016INFLUENCEOM, title={INFLUENCE OF MATERNAL MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES ON THE MUCOSAL MICROBIOME OF NEONATAL PIGS. Maradiaga,}, author={Nidia and Zeineldin and Mohamed and Aldridge and Brian and Lowe}, year={2016} }