I. An account of Mr. James Christopher Le Blon's principles of printing, in imitation of painting, and of weaving tapestry, in the same manner as brocades

@article{MortimerIAA,
  title={I. An account of Mr. James Christopher Le Blon's principles of printing, in imitation of painting, and of weaving tapestry, in the same manner as brocades},
  author={Cromwell Mortimer},
  journal={Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London},
  volume={37},
  pages={101 - 107}
}
  • C. Mortimer
  • Art
  • Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London
Mr. Le Blon endeavouring to fix the true Harmony of Colouring in Painting, found that all visible Objects may be represented by the three primitive Colours, Red, yellow, and Blue; for out of them, all others, even Black itself, may be compounded. 

Pedagogy through print: James Sowerby, John Mawe and the problem of colour in early nineteenth-century natural history illustration

  • B. Dolan
  • History
    The British Journal for the History of Science
  • 1998
These gems have life in them: their colours speak, Say what words fail of. In an ambitious treatise on the estimated wealth of the British Empire in the year of Waterloo, Patrick Colquhoun added to

The Technology and Treatment of an Embossed, Chromolithographic 'Mechanical' Victorian Valentine Card

The Smithsonian Institution houses the National Valentine Collection. One Valentine, a stand-up "mechanical" card, required removal of adhesive on its base and verve (Figs. 1, 11, and 12). the card

1 – The Origins of Modern Color Science