I.—On the Tripartite Classification of the Lower Palæozoic Rocks

@article{LapworthIOnTT,
  title={I.—On the Tripartite Classification of the Lower Pal{\ae}ozoic Rocks},
  author={Charles Lapworth},
  journal={Geological Magazine},
  volume={6},
  pages={1 - 15}
}
  • C. Lapworth
  • Published 1 January 1879
  • Geology
  • Geological Magazine
BY those accustomed to the hopeless confusion of the Greywacké of the earlier geologists, the publication of Murchison's grand work on the “Silurian System” was hailed with feelings of the most profound relief and satisfaction. His clear and brilliant presentation of the physical and palæontological proofs of an orderly sequence among the Palæozoic Rocks below the Old Red Sandstone, as originally set forth in all their force and harmony in his magnificent volumes, naturally astonished and… 
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  • 1976
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Charles lapworth was born in 1842 at Faringdon, in Berkshire. Five years afterwards his parents removed to Lower Newton, one of the farms rented by his grandfather. He attended the country school at
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