I recognize your face but I can't remember your name: Further evidence on the tip-of-the-tongue phenomenon.

@article{Yarmey1973IRY,
  title={I recognize your face but I can't remember your name: Further evidence on the tip-of-the-tongue phenomenon.},
  author={A D Yarmey},
  journal={Memory & cognition},
  year={1973},
  volume={1 3},
  pages={287-90}
}
Fifty faces of "famous" persons were used as stimuli to precipitate the tip-of-the-tongue (TOT) experience. Results showed that Ss in TOT states searched for target's name by locating first his profession, where he was most often seen, and how recently. Ss also had accurate knowledge of the initial letters of target names, initial letters of similar sounding names, and numbers of syllables in target names. It was concluded that TOT states for to-be-remembered names are retrieved from semantic… CONTINUE READING

From This Paper

Topics from this paper.

Citations

Publications citing this paper.
Showing 1-10 of 30 extracted citations

Face Recognition without Identification

View 3 Excerpts
Highly Influenced

The roles of perceptual and conceptual information in face recognition.

Journal of experimental psychology. General • 2016
View 6 Excerpts
Highly Influenced

What do we know about what we cannot remember? Accessing the semantic attributes of words that cannot be recalled.

Journal of experimental psychology. Learning, memory, and cognition • 2003
View 2 Excerpts
Highly Influenced

A review of the tip-of-the-tongue experience.

Psychological bulletin • 1991
View 8 Excerpts
Highly Influenced

Object Concepts in the Chemical Senses

Cognitive Science • 2014
View 1 Excerpt

Similar Papers

Loading similar papers…