I Am Against Us? Unpacking Cultural Differences in Ingroup Favoritism via Dialecticism

@article{MaKellams2011IAA,
  title={I Am Against Us? Unpacking Cultural Differences in Ingroup Favoritism via Dialecticism},
  author={Christine Ma-Kellams and Julie Spencer-Rodgers and K. Peng},
  journal={Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin},
  year={2011},
  volume={37},
  pages={15 - 27}
}
The authors proposed a novel explanation for cultural differences in ingroup favoritism (dialecticism) and tested this hypothesis across cultures/ethnicities, domains, and levels of analysis (explicit vs. implicit, cognitive vs. affective). Dialecticism refers to the cognitive tendency to tolerate contradiction and is more frequently found among East Asian than North American cultures. In Study 1, Chinese were significantly less positive, compared to European Americans, in their explicit… Expand

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