Hysterectomy and risk of stress-urinary-incontinence surgery: nationwide cohort study

@article{Altman2007HysterectomyAR,
  title={Hysterectomy and risk of stress-urinary-incontinence surgery: nationwide cohort study},
  author={Daniel Altman and Fredrik Granath and Sven Cnattingius and Christian Falconer},
  journal={The Lancet},
  year={2007},
  volume={370},
  pages={1494-1499}
}
BACKGROUND Hysterectomy for benign indications has been associated with an increased risk for lower-urinary-tract sequela, but results have been inconclusive. We aimed to establish the risk for stress-urinary-incontinence surgery after hysterectomy for benign indications. METHODS We did a nationwide, population-based, cohort study from 1973 to 2003 in Sweden. We identified our population from the Swedish Inpatient Registry. We selected 165 260 women who had undergone hysterectomy (exposed… Expand
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TLDR
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Vaginal delivery, obesity, and daily urge symptoms without incontinence prior to surgery increased de novo urinary incentinence and had a negative influence on the rate of remission of urinary incontinent after hysterectomy, which in turn influenced patients' satisfaction with surgery. Expand
Hysterectomy is not associated with de-novo urinary incontinence: A ten-year cohort study.
TLDR
No significant difference was found after hysterectomy compared to controls in the prevalence or incidence proportions of UI after 10 years follow-up, but substantial amount of changes in continence status from continent to incontinent and vice versa in all three groups were found. Expand
Comparison of de novo urinary incontinence after abdominal and vaginal hysterectomy.
TLDR
It was showed that de novo UI occured frequently after hysterectomies, and development and types of UI following AH and VH were comparable. Expand
Hysterectomy and stress urinary incontinence
TLDR
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TLDR
It is found that pelvic organ fistula surgery is four times more common in women after hysterectomy than vaginal vault prolapse and stress urinary incontinence surgery, and previous surgically managed pelvic floor disorder was the main risk factor for the development of vaginal vault Prolapse subsequent to a hystrectomy. Expand
Predicting the development of stress urinary incontinence 3 years after hysterectomy
TLDR
A prediction rule to predict the individual risk to develop stress urinary incontinence (SUI) after hysterectomy is defined that can be used to counsel patients about their individual risk on developing SUI following hystEREctomy. Expand
Hysterectomy associated with de novo lower urinary tract symptoms in a Taiwanese population: a nationwide, population-based study
TLDR
It was found that undergoing hysterectomy was associated with increased risks of developing lower urinary tract symptoms in women, and this association was more pronounced for women undergoing the vaginal or laparoscopically assisted hysteretomy. Expand
Urinary incontinence after hysterectomy- does type of surgery matter?
TLDR
Hysterectomy constitutes a risk factor for the development of urinary incontinence but the occurrence of postoperative UI does not depend on the type of surgery. Expand
Vaginal hysterectomy and risk of pelvic organ prolapse and stress urinary incontinence surgery
TLDR
Having a vaginal hysterectomy for other reasons also significantly increased the risks of POP and SUI surgery compared to other modes of hystEREctomy, and was associated with an increased risk for subsequent POP andSUI surgery. Expand
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