Hypothesis: Is low prenatal vitamin D a risk-modifying factor for schizophrenia?

@article{McGrath1999HypothesisIL,
  title={Hypothesis: Is low prenatal vitamin D a risk-modifying factor for schizophrenia?},
  author={John J. McGrath},
  journal={Schizophrenia Research},
  year={1999},
  volume={40},
  pages={173-177}
}
  • J. McGrath
  • Published 21 December 1999
  • Medicine
  • Schizophrenia Research
The central nervous system is increasingly being recognised as a target organ for vitamin D via its wide-ranging steroid hormonal effects and via the induction of various proteins such as nerve growth factor. This paper proposes that low maternal vitamin D may impact adversely on the developing foetal brain, leaving the affected offspring at increased risk of adult-onset schizophrenia. The hypothesis can parsimoniously explain diverse epidemiological features of schizophrenia, such as the… Expand
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