Hypohydration per se affects mood states and executive cognitive processing: results from a face-valid model for studying some consequences of 'voluntary dehydration'

Abstract

Introduction There is limited literature on the effects of a deficit in body water on human cognitive function, with inconsistent and contradictory results. In his critical review of this area Lieberman [1] recommended that typical confounding factors such as the method to induce dehydration (exercise, heat stress, diuretics) and other experimental control (sleep, diet, caffeine) should be considered carefully as little existing research has done so. Few studies have actually assessed what occurs naturally, namely a person simply not drinking sufficiently. The purpose of this study was to measure the cognitive effects of ‘not drinking enough’ (’voluntary dehydration’) when other confounding factors such as sleep, diet and caffeine are controlled.

DOI: 10.1186/2046-7648-4-S1-A97

Cite this paper

@inproceedings{Mndel2015HypohydrationPS, title={Hypohydration per se affects mood states and executive cognitive processing: results from a face-valid model for studying some consequences of 'voluntary dehydration'}, author={Toby M{\"{u}ndel and Stephen R. Hill and Stephen J. Legg}, booktitle={Extreme Physiology & Medicine}, year={2015} }