Hypnotizability and weight loss in obese subjects

@article{Barabasz1989HypnotizabilityAW,
  title={Hypnotizability and weight loss in obese subjects},
  author={Marianne Barabasz and David Spiegel},
  journal={International Journal of Eating Disorders},
  year={1989},
  volume={8},
  pages={335-341}
}
This study tested the effects of hypnosis for weight control. Hypnotizability was assessed by the Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale: Form C (SHSS:C). Forty-five subjects completed the study with examiners who were blind with respect to hypnotizability scores. Subjects exposed to a simple self-management technique and to the Spiegel and Spiegel (1978) hypnosis intervention, modified to include specific food aversion, lost significantly more weight at a 3-month follow-up than subjects… 
Hypnotic enhancement of cognitive-behavioral weight loss treatments--another meta-reanalysis.
In a 3rd meta-analysis of the effect of adding hypnosis to cognitive-behavioral treatments for weight reduction, additional data were obtained from authors of 2 studies, and computational
Hypnosis as an Adjunct to Cognitive-Behavioral Psychotherapy for Obesity: A Meta-Analytic Reappraisal
1. Kirsch, G. Montgomery, and G. Sapirstein (1995) meta-analyzed 6 weight-loss studies comparing the efficacy of cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) alone to CBT plus hypnotherapy and concluded that the
Hypnosis as an adjunct to cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy for obesity: a meta-analytic reappraisal.
TLDR
It is concluded that the addition of hypnosis to CBT for weight loss results in, at most, a small enhancement of treatment outcome.
Hypnotic enhancement of cognitive-behavioral weight loss treatments--another meta-reanalysis.
  • I. Kirsch
  • Psychology
    Journal of consulting and clinical psychology
  • 1996
TLDR
Correlational analyses indicated that the benefits of hypnosis increased substantially over time (r = .74), and computational inaccuracies in both previous meta-analyses were corrected.
Hypnosis as an adjunct to cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy: A meta-analysis.
: A meta-analysis was performed on 18 studies in which a cognitive-behavioral therapy was compared with the same therapy supplemented by hypnosis. The results indicated that the addition of hypnosis
Hypnosis as an adjunct to cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy: a meta-analysis.
A meta-analysis was performed on 18 studies in which a cognitive-behavioral therapy was compared with the same therapy supplemented by hypnosis. The results indicated that the addition of hypnosis
Efficacy of Hypnotherapy in the Treatment of Eating Disorders
  • M. Barabasz
  • Psychology, Medicine
    The International journal of clinical and experimental hypnosis
  • 2007
TLDR
This paper focuses on the three primary disorders of interest to clinicians: bulimia nervosa, anorexia nervosa and obesity, and focuses on literature with replicable methodological descriptions.
The Effectiveness of Hypnosis as an Intervention for Obesity: A Meta-Analytic Review
TLDR
The findings suggest hypnosis is very effective in producing weight loss over a relatively short span of time, but more research is needed on the long-term benefits in follow-up periods of 1 to 5 years.
The (limited) possibilities of hypnotherapy in the treatment of obesity.
TLDR
A brief overview of specific hypnotherapeutic techniques--such as teaching relaxation, increasing self-control, encouraging physical exercise, altering self-esteem and body image, strengthening motivation, and exploring ambivalence for change--that can be involved in a multidimensional approach to obesity are provided.
Research on hypnosis as an adjunct to cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy
  • N. Schoenberger
  • Psychology
    The International journal of clinical and experimental hypnosis
  • 2000
TLDR
For cognitive-behavioral hypnotherapies to be recognized as empirically supported treatments, a number of well-designed, randomized clinical trials are necessary.
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The findings suggest that the efficacy of hypnosis as a weight-reduction strategy is attributable to factors shared in common with a minimum treatment condition, including positive expectancy, weekly participation in a reduction program, relaxation training, and limited dietary counseling.
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A program of time-limited, relatively un-contaminated hypnotherapy for the treatment of obesity indicates a statistically significant positive association between degree of hypnotizability and success at weight reduction.
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The approach has proven successful with many patients, but two year follow up data was available for 10 only, and it is upon these that the article concentrates.
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TLDR
In spite of sufficient individual differences, hypnotizability failed to predict weight loss for these 20 women, finding that obese subjects are not unusually suggestible.
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Abstract This treatment paradim was developed to increase subjects' control over food intake while considering the economics of time and expense to the client. A three session treatment was provided
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TLDR
Bulimic patients were highly hypnotizable, significantly more so than the patients with anorexia nervosa and age-matched populations, and there was also a trend for the purging subgroup of anorectics to have higher hypnotic capacity than abstaining anoreCTics.
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In a treatment program for obesity utilizing hypnosis, internal Rotter I-E scores correlated (r = .60, p < .025) with measures of weight loss. The depth of hypnotic trance did not correlate with
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TLDR
The major results suggest positive treatment outcomes to be related to greater hypnotizability, absorption, hypnotist experience level, procedural thoroughness, and client-therapist contact time.
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