Hypnotic Treatment of Chronic Pain

@article{Jensen2005HypnoticTO,
  title={Hypnotic Treatment of Chronic Pain},
  author={Mark J. Jensen and David R. Patterson},
  journal={Journal of Behavioral Medicine},
  year={2005},
  volume={29},
  pages={95-124}
}
This article reviews controlled trials of hypnotic treatment for chronic pain in terms of: (1) analyses comparing the effects of hypnotic treatment to six types of control conditions; (2) component analyses; and (3) predictor analyses. The findings indicate that hypnotic analgesia produces significantly greater decreases in pain relative to no-treatment and to some non-hypnotic interventions such as medication management, physical therapy, and education/advice. However, the effects of self… 
THE EFFICACY OF HYPNOTIC ANALGESIA IN ADULTS: A REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE.
TLDR
Suggestions are offered for practitioners who are using, or would like to use, hypnosis for the amelioration of pain problems in their patients or clients and factors that may influence the efficacy of hypnotic analgesia interventions are discussed.
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TLDR
It is found that hypnosis interventions consistently produce significant decreases in pain associated with a variety of chronic-pain problems and was generally found to be more effective than nonhypnotic interventions such as attention, physical therapy, and education.
The Role of Suggestions in Hypnosis for Chronic Pain: A Review of the Literature.
TLDR
This review focused on the types of suggestions used in twenty five studies comparing hypnosis to active treatments, non-treatment control groups, or both in adult populations with various chronic pain conditions to address the issue of differences in the content of hypnotic suggestions.
A Meta-Analysis of Hypnosis for Chronic Pain Problems: A Comparison Between Hypnosis, Standard Care, and Other Psychological Interventions
TLDR
The results suggest that hypnosis is efficacious for managing chronic pain and given that large heterogeneity among the included studies was identified, the nature of hypnosis treatment is further discussed.
A Comparison of Self-Hypnosis Versus Progressive Muscle Relaxation in Patients With Multiple Sclerosis and Chronic Pain
TLDR
The results support the efficacy of self-hypnosis training for the management of chronic pain in persons with MS.
Hypnotizability and chronic pain: an ambiguous connection
TLDR
Data indicate that high hypnotic susceptibility is not necessary for the relief of chronic pain obtained through hypnotic treatment, and being highly susceptible to hypnosis does not represent a higher risk for developing chronic pain; in addition, high hypnotizability may be a favourable protective factor against the possible cardiovascular consequences of chronicPain.
The effectiveness of hypnosis for reducing procedure-related pain in children and adolescents: a comprehensive methodological review
TLDR
Hypnosis was consistently found to be more effective than control conditions in alleviating discomfort associated with bone marrow aspirations, lumbar punctures, voiding cystourethograms, the Nuss procedure, and post-surgical pain.
Hypnosis can reduce pain in hospitalized older patients: a randomized controlled study
TLDR
Hypnosis represents a safe and valuable tool in chronic pain management of hospitalized older patients and in hospital interventions did not provide long term post discharge relief.
Neuromodulatory treatments for chronic pain: efficacy and mechanisms
TLDR
On the basis of the data discussed in this Review, training in the use of self-hypnosis might be considered a viable 'first-line' approach to treat chronic pain.
Current psychological approaches to the management of chronic pain
TLDR
Cognitive-behavioral therapy and operant behavioral therapy treatments focus on factors that exacerbate or maintain suffering in chronic pain, and should be considered as part of a multidisciplinary treatment paradigm.
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