Hypersegregation in U.S. Metropolitan Areas: Black and Hispanic Segregation Along Five Dimensions

@article{Massey2011HypersegregationIU,
  title={Hypersegregation in U.S. Metropolitan Areas: Black and Hispanic Segregation Along Five Dimensions},
  author={D. Massey and N. Denton},
  journal={Demography},
  year={2011},
  volume={26},
  pages={373-391}
}
  • D. Massey, N. Denton
  • Published 2011
  • Economics, Medicine
  • Demography
  • Residential segregation has traditionally been measured by using the index of dissimilarity and, more recently, the P* exposure index. These indices, however, measure only two of five potential dimensions of segregation and, by themselves, understate the degree of black segregation in U.S. society. Compared with Hispanics, not only are blacks more segregated on any single dimension of residential segregation, they are also likely to be segregated on all five dimensions simultaneously, which… CONTINUE READING

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