Hyperoxaluria and intestinal disease

@article{Stauffer2005HyperoxaluriaAI,
  title={Hyperoxaluria and intestinal disease},
  author={John Q. Stauffer},
  journal={The American Journal of Digestive Diseases},
  year={2005},
  volume={22},
  pages={921-928}
}
  • J. Stauffer
  • Published 1 October 1977
  • Chemistry, Medicine
  • The American Journal of Digestive Diseases
Hyperoxaluria was documented in patients with pancreatic insufficiency, adult celiac disease, regional enteritis after ileectomy and partial colectomy, and jejunoileal bypass. The degree of hyperoxaluria correlated directly with the severity of the steatorrhea and inversely with the dietary calcium content. High-calcium diets suppressed oxalate excretion to normal when fecal fat excretion was approximatelys 30 g/day or less. In patients with more severe steatorrhea, decreasing dietary fat and… 
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The incidence of urinary tract calculi after small-intestinal bypass operations for treatment of obesity
SummaryJejunoileal bypass operations have been used for more than 20 years for the treatment of massive obesity. This treatment results in malabsorption with diarrhoea, especially during the first
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Five of 18 patients with ileal resection, two of seven with bacterial over-growth, and six of 15 with miscellaneous conditions, including nontropical sprue and cirrhosis, had hyperoxaluria.
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TLDR
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Increased concentration and excretion of urinary crystalloids, possibly related to the administration of adrenal corticosteroids, persistent excretions of an acid urine, and intestinal surgery, may be important factors in the pathogenesis of nephrolithiasis in inflammatory bowel disease.
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