Hypercomputation and the Physical Church‐Turing Thesis

@article{Cotogno2003HypercomputationAT,
  title={Hypercomputation and the Physical Church‐Turing Thesis},
  author={Paolo Cotogno},
  journal={The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science},
  year={2003},
  volume={54},
  pages={181 - 223}
}
  • Paolo Cotogno
  • Published 1 June 2003
  • Philosophy, Computer Science
  • The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science
A version of the Church‐Turing Thesis states that every effectively realizable physical system can be defined by Turing Machines (‘Thesis P’); in this formulation the Thesis appears an empirical, more than a logico‐mathematical, proposition. We review the main approaches to computation beyond Turing definability (‘hypercomputation’): supertask, non‐well‐founded, analog, quantum, and retrocausal computation. These models depend on infinite computation, explicitly or implicitly, and appear… 
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  • Mathematics, Philosophy
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We claim that a recent article of P. Cotogno ([2003]) in this journal is based on an incorrect argument concerning the non-computability of diagonal functions. The point is that whilst diagonal
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We aim to put some order to the multiple interpretations of the ChurchTuring Thesis and to the different approaches taken to prove or disprove it. [Answer:] Rosser and its inventor proved that its
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