Hypercarnivory and the brain: protein requirements of cats reconsidered

@article{Eisert2010HypercarnivoryAT,
  title={Hypercarnivory and the brain: protein requirements of cats reconsidered},
  author={Regina Eisert},
  journal={Journal of Comparative Physiology B},
  year={2010},
  volume={181},
  pages={1-17}
}
  • R. Eisert
  • Published 2010
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of Comparative Physiology B
The domestic hypercarnivores cat and mink have a higher protein requirement than other domestic mammals. This has been attributed to adaptation to a hypercarnivorous diet and subsequent loss of the ability to downregulate amino acid catabolism. A quantitative analysis of brain glucose requirements reveals that in cats on their natural diet, a significant proportion of protein must be diverted into gluconeogenesis to supply the brain. According to the model presented here, the high protein… Expand
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