Hyperactivity, impulsivity, inattention (HIA) and conduct problems among African American youth: the roles of neighborhood and gender.

Abstract

This study replicated and extended prior research by examining neighborhood context as a moderator of the relation between the constellation of hyperactivity, impulsivity, and attention (HIA) difficulties and conduct problems among African American youth (11-16 years old; 55% girls) from single mother homes (N = 193). Using audio computer-assisted interview (ACASI) software, mother-child dyads provided ratings of HIA difficulties and two domains of conduct problems: aggression and rule-breaking. In addition, both subjective (mother-report) and objective (census data) indices of neighborhood context were assessed. Findings revealed that both subjective and objective indices of neighborhood context moderated the relation between HIA and conduct problems, but the pattern of moderation differed depending on the index and combination of reporters. Future research directions and implications of the findings are discussed.

DOI: 10.1007/s10802-008-9296-7

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@article{Zalot2009HyperactivityII, title={Hyperactivity, impulsivity, inattention (HIA) and conduct problems among African American youth: the roles of neighborhood and gender.}, author={Alecia A. Zalot and Deborah Lynne Jones and Carlye Y Kincaid and Tasia M. Smith}, journal={Journal of abnormal child psychology}, year={2009}, volume={37 4}, pages={535-49} }