HypTrails: A Bayesian Approach for Comparing Hypotheses About Human Trails on the Web

@article{Singer2015HypTrailsAB,
  title={HypTrails: A Bayesian Approach for Comparing Hypotheses About Human Trails on the Web},
  author={Philipp Singer and D. Helic and Andreas Hotho and Markus Strohmaier},
  journal={Proceedings of the 24th International Conference on World Wide Web},
  year={2015}
}
  • P. Singer, D. Helic, M. Strohmaier
  • Published 11 November 2014
  • Computer Science
  • Proceedings of the 24th International Conference on World Wide Web
When users interact with the Web today, they leave sequential digital trails on a massive scale. Examples of such human trails include Web navigation, sequences of online restaurant reviews, or online music play lists. Understanding the factors that drive the production of these trails can be useful for e.g., improving underlying network structures, predicting user clicks or enhancing recommendations. In this work, we present a general approach called HypTrails for comparing a set of hypotheses… 

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