Hymenopteran Parasitoids Attacking the Invasive Emerald Ash Borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in Western and Central Pennsylvania

@inproceedings{Duan2013HymenopteranPA,
  title={Hymenopteran Parasitoids Attacking the Invasive Emerald Ash Borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in Western and Central Pennsylvania},
  author={Jian J. Duan and Philip B. Taylor and Roger W. Fuester and Robert R. Kula and Paul M. Marsh},
  year={2013}
}
ABSTRACT We conducted field surveys of the emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, and associated larval parasitoids in western and central Pennsylvania (Cranberry Township in Butler County and Granville in Mifflin County) in the spring and fall of 2009. The survey procedure involved destructively debarking sections of the main trunk (bole) of EAB-infested green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh.) trees from the ground to the height of 2 m. Three species of the hymenopteran… 

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Investigation of key reproductive traits of the parasitoid, including egg maturation dynamics, and host size preference and suitability in association with the beetle showed that female wasps emerged with a substantial portion of their lifetime complement of mature eggs and matured eggs rapidly, reaching a peak 4–6 d post-eclosion.

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TLDR
These parasitoid species may be complementary to current classical biological control programs against EAB in North America, which have been focusing primarily on the introduction of exotic larval and egg parasitoids from China.

PARASITOIDS ATTACKING THE EMERALD ASH BORER ( COLEOPTERA : BUPRESTIDAE ) IN WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA

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These parasitoid species may be complementary to current classical biological control programs against EAB in North America, which have been focusing primarily on the introduction of exotic larval and egg parasitoids from China.

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Populations of hymenopteran parasitoids associated with larval stages of the invasive emerald ash borer (EAB) Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire were surveyed in 2009 and 2010 in the recently invaded areas in north central United States (Michigan).

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Measuring the Impact of Biotic Factors on Populations of Immature Emerald Ash Borers (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)

TLDR
There were no significant differences in mortality rates because of parasitism between parasitoid-release and control plots, and T. planipennisi was detected in each of the three release sites by the end of the study but was not detected in the experimental cohorts or associated wild larvae in any of theThree control plots.

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TLDR
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Relationships between the emergence and oviposition of ectoparasitoid Spathius agrili Yang and its host emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire

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The emergence date of parasitoid asynchronously inosculated with the optimum developmental instars of the earliest host larvae, which was the result of a long-term co-evolution between the two species, suggests good synchrony between parasitoids emergence and host availability.

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TLDR
Results from this study showed that offspring production and critical fitness parameters of T. planipennisi from parasitized emerald ash borer larvae are significantly influenced by host plant substrate type, host-parasitoid group size, parasitoid-to-host ratio, or a combination in the primary exposure assay.