Hygiene Hypothesis and Autoimmune Diseases

@article{Rook2011HygieneHA,
  title={Hygiene Hypothesis and Autoimmune Diseases},
  author={Graham A W Rook},
  journal={Clinical Reviews in Allergy \& Immunology},
  year={2011},
  volume={42},
  pages={5-15}
}
  • G. Rook
  • Published 2011
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Clinical Reviews in Allergy & Immunology
Throughout the twentieth century, there were striking increases in the incidences of many chronic inflammatory disorders in the rich developed countries. These included autoimmune disorders such as Type 1 diabetes and multiple sclerosis. Although genetics and specific triggering mechanisms such as molecular mimicry and viruses are likely to be involved, the increases have been so rapid that any explanation that omits environmental change is incomplete. This chapter suggests that a series of… Expand
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