Hydrodynamic trail following in a California sea lion (Zalophus californianus)

@article{Glser2010HydrodynamicTF,
  title={Hydrodynamic trail following in a California sea lion (Zalophus californianus)},
  author={Nele Gl{\"a}ser and Sven Wieskotten and Chris Otter and Guido Dehnhardt and Wolf Hanke},
  journal={Journal of Comparative Physiology A},
  year={2010},
  volume={197},
  pages={141-151}
}
The mystacial vibrissae of pinnipeds constitute a sensory system for active touch and detection of hydrodynamic events. Harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) and California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) can both detect hydrodynamic stimuli caused by a small sphere vibrating in the water (hydrodynamic dipole stimuli). Hydrodynamic trail following has only been shown in harbour seals. Hydrodynamical and biomechanical studies of single vibrissae of the two species showed that the specialized… 
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TLDR
To test the hypothesis that northern elephant seals have increased innervation as other pinnipeds, vibrissae from the ventral‐caudal mystacial field from nine individuals were sectioned and stained for microstructure (trichrome) and innervation (Bodian silver stain) and the results add to the growing body of evidence that phocids, and perhaps all pinnIPeds, possess highly sensitive mystacial vibrISSae that detect prey.
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