Hybridization as an invasion of the genome.

@article{Mallet2005HybridizationAA,
  title={Hybridization as an invasion of the genome.},
  author={J. Mallet},
  journal={Trends in ecology & evolution},
  year={2005},
  volume={20 5},
  pages={
          229-37
        }
}
  • J. Mallet
  • Published 2005
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Trends in ecology & evolution
  • Hybridization between species is commonplace in plants, but is often seen as unnatural and unusual in animals. Here, I survey studies of natural interspecific hybridization in plants and a variety of animals. At least 25% of plant species and 10% of animal species, mostly the youngest species, are involved in hybridization and potential introgression with other species. Species in nature are often incompletely isolated for millions of years after their formation. Therefore, much evolution of… CONTINUE READING
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