Hunting, social status and biological fitness

@article{Gurven2006HuntingSS,
  title={Hunting, social status and biological fitness},
  author={Michael D. Gurven and Christopher R. von Rueden},
  journal={Social Biology},
  year={2006},
  volume={53},
  pages={81 - 99}
}
Abstract Hunting performance may be one of the most important routes to high prestige or social status among men in hunter‐gatherer societies. Higher social status based on hunting performance has been linked to higher biological fitness outcomes almost everywhere this relationship has been investigated. This paper explores the proximate pathways underlying the positive correlation between hunting success and fitness, and discusses these in light of recent debates concerning the role of men in… 
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In the last few decades, there has been much research regarding the importance of social prestige in shaping the social structure of small-scale societies. While recent studies show that social
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