Humeral anatomy of the KNM-ER 47000 upper limb skeleton from Ileret, Kenya: Implications for taxonomic identification.

@article{Lague2019HumeralAO,
  title={Humeral anatomy of the KNM-ER 47000 upper limb skeleton from Ileret, Kenya: Implications for taxonomic identification.},
  author={Michael R. Lague and Habiba Chirchir and David J Green and Emma N. Mbua and John W. K. Harris and David R. Braun and Nicole L. Griffin and Brian G. Richmond},
  journal={Journal of human evolution},
  year={2019},
  volume={126},
  pages={
          24-38
        }
}

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