Human vomeronasal organ function: a critical review of best and worst cases.

@article{Meredith2001HumanVO,
  title={Human vomeronasal organ function: a critical review of best and worst cases.},
  author={Michael Meredith},
  journal={Chemical senses},
  year={2001},
  volume={26 4},
  pages={
          433-45
        }
}
  • M. Meredith
  • Published 2001
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Chemical senses
The human vomeronasal organ (VNO) has been the subject of some interest in the scientific literature and of considerable speculation in the popular science literature. A function for the human VNO has been both dismissed with ridicule and averred with conviction. This question of VNO function has been needlessly tied to the separate question of whether there is any place for pheromone communication among humans, a topic that is itself bogged down in conflicting definitions. This review is an… Expand
VOMERONASAL ORGAN IN DOMESTIC ANIMALS (A SHORT SURVEY)
TLDR
The vomeronasal organ (VNO) is an anatomical formation, with unique structure and function, located below the nasal mucous coat, ventrolaterally to the nasal septum and participates in the social and sexual communication as a chemosensory organ. Expand
Anatomical evidence for an endocrine activity of the vomeronasal organ in humans
TLDR
The findings presented here confirm the bilateral presence of the VNO in adult cadavers and demonstrate morphological connections of VNO receptor cells with the underlying capillaries and possible endocrine activity associated with the epithelium of this chemosensory structure has been demonstrated by the expression of calcium‐binding protein in a part of these receptor cells. Expand
Structure and function of the vomeronasal organ.
TLDR
Recent studies indicate that pheromone-like compounds are most likely registered at the level of olfactory receptor cells, rendering the chemical information system more independent of specific organ structures. Expand
Reappraisal of the vomeronasal system of catarrhine primates: Ontogeny, morphology, functionality, and persisting questions
TLDR
These recent findings demonstrate that previous investigations on some catarrhine primates may have missed the VNO and underestimated the extent of variability, and are needed to consider phylogenetic implications of VNO variability and the association of craniofacial form and VNO anatomic position in primates. Expand
Controversies on the human vomeronasal system.
TLDR
A review of the literature indicates that most of evidence for a functional human vomeronasal system has been p rovided by physiological studies conducted by a single re s e a rch group, and anatomical evidence does not support the existence of neural substrates for these physiological effects. Expand
The vomeronasal organ is not involved in the perception of endogenous odors
TLDR
It is demonstrated that functional occlusion of the VNO does not change the percept of, sensitivity toward, or functional neuronal processing of a putative human pheromone, and this results provide strong evidence that the human VNO has no obvious function. Expand
On the chemosensory nature of the vomeronasal epithelium in adult humans
TLDR
Investigations in the vomeronasal organs of 22 human cadavers, three adult biopsies, one embryo and one fetus by means of immunohistochemistry did not support the hypothesis that neural connections between the VNE and central brain structures might be present. Expand
The Risk of Extrapolation in Neuroanatomy: The Case of the Mammalian Vomeronasal System†
TLDR
It is hypothesised that the vomeronasal system, considered for all mammalian species, could be a system undergoing involution or regression, and could serve as one more integrated olfactory subsystem. Expand
Facts, fallacies, fears, and frustrations with human pheromones.
  • C. Wysocki, G. Preti
  • Biology, Medicine
  • The anatomical record. Part A, Discoveries in molecular, cellular, and evolutionary biology
  • 2004
TLDR
The likelihood of pheromonal communication in humans is assessed with a discussion of chemical compounds produced by the axilla that may function as phersomones; the likelihood that the vomeronasal organ (VNO), a putative pheromone receptor organ in many other mammals, is functional in humans; and the possible ways pheramones operate in humans. Expand
The vomeronasal organ – incidence in a Bulgarian population
TLDR
More research should be focused on revealing the incidence and functionality of the organ, and on its preservation in surgical manipulations that affect the nasal septum and other nearby structures. Expand
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TLDR
Functional brain imaging studies revealed consistent activation of the hypothalamus, amygdala and cingulate gyrus‐related structures during adult human VNO stimulation, presenting new information supportive of a functional vomeronasal system in adult humans. Expand
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TLDR
The fine structure and morphologic findings suggest that a chemosensory epithelium corresponding to a vomeronasal organ may exist, and its central connections and the possible functional significance for pheromone detection are unknown. Expand
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TLDR
Electron microscopy of the adult human vomeronasal organ indicates the presence of two potential receptor elements in the pseudostratified epithelial lining: microvillar cells, and unmyelinated, intraepithelial axons, which appear to constitute the components essential for a functional chemosensory system. Expand
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TLDR
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Sensitivity and behavioral responses to the pheromone androstenone are not mediated by the vomeronasal organ in domestic pigs.
TLDR
It is concluded that in the domestic pig, the vomeronasal organ is not necessary for androstenone detection or androstanone-mediated sexual behavior in estrous females. Expand
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TLDR
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