Human skin pigmentation as an adaptation to UV radiation

@article{Jablonski2010HumanSP,
  title={Human skin pigmentation as an adaptation to UV radiation},
  author={Nina G. Jablonski and George Chaplin},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences},
  year={2010},
  volume={107},
  pages={8962 - 8968}
}
Human skin pigmentation is the product of two clines produced by natural selection to adjust levels of constitutive pigmentation to levels of UV radiation (UVR). One cline was generated by high UVR near the equator and led to the evolution of dark, photoprotective, eumelanin-rich pigmentation. The other was produced by the requirement for UVB photons to sustain cutaneous photosynthesis of vitamin D3 in low-UVB environments, and resulted in the evolution of depigmented skin. As hominins… Expand
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