Human prostate cancer risk factors

@article{Bostwick2004HumanPC,
  title={Human prostate cancer risk factors},
  author={David G. Bostwick and Harry B. Burke and Daniel Djakiew and Susan Y. Euling and Shuk-Mei Ho and Joseph R. Landolph and Howard I. Morrison and Babasaheb R. Sonawane and Tiffany Shifflett and David J. Waters and Barry G. Timms},
  journal={Cancer},
  year={2004},
  volume={101}
}
Prostate cancer has the highest prevalence of any nonskin cancer in the human body, with similar likelihood of neoplastic foci found within the prostates of men around the world regardless of diet, occupation, lifestyle, or other factors. Essentially all men with circulating androgens will develop microscopic prostate cancer if they live long enough. This review is a contemporary and comprehensive, literature‐based analysis of the putative risk factors for human prostate cancer, and the results… Expand
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