Human power output during repeated sprint cycle exercise: the influence of thermal stress

@article{Ball1999HumanPO,
  title={Human power output during repeated sprint cycle exercise: the influence of thermal stress},
  author={Derek Ball and Caroline J. Burrows and Anthony J. Sargeant},
  journal={European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology},
  year={1999},
  volume={79},
  pages={360-366}
}
Thermal stress is known to impair endurance capacity during moderate prolonged exercise. However, there is relatively little available information concerning the effects of thermal stress on the performance of high-intensity short-duration exercise. The present experiment examined human power output during repeated bouts of short-term maximal exercise. On two separate occasions, seven healthy males performed two 30-s bouts of sprint exercise (sprints I and II), with 4 min of passive recovery in… 
Acute heat exposure increases high-intensity performance during sprint cycle exercise
TLDR
The results of this study suggest that the exposure to hot environment caused an improvement in power output for a single 30-s sprint and was associated with an elevation in plasma ammonia suggestive of an increase in adenine nucleotide loss.
Effect of recovery intensity on peak power output and the development of heat strain during intermittent sprint exercise while under heat stress.
TLDR
By lowering the recovery intensity, one component of the PSI (heart rate) was reduced and intermittent sprint exercise performance was maintained for longer in the heat and heat strain was calculated from rectal temperature and heart rate.
Hot ambient conditions do not alter intermittent cycling sprint performance.
TLDR
Despite higher cardiovascular and perceptual strain in the hot trial, heat exposure did not alter neither peak power output nor related muscle activation and neuromuscular efficiency in the absence of hyperthermia.
Diurnal effects of prior heat stress exposure on sprint and endurance exercise capacity in the heat
TLDR
It is demonstrated that an approximately 1 °C increase in core temperature by prior HSE has the diurnal effects on endurance exercise capacity but not on sprint exercise capacity in the heat.
Elevations in core and muscle temperature impairs repeated sprint performance.
TLDR
Although an elevated muscle temperature is expected to promote sprint performance, power output during the repeated sprints was reduced by hyperthermia, suggesting that the impaired performance does not seem to relate to the accumulation of recognized metabolic fatigue agents and it is suggested that it may related to the influence of high core temperature on the function of the central nervous system.
Effects of environmental temperature on physiological responses during submaximal and maximal exercises in soccer players
TLDR
It is concluded that physiological responses and endurance exercise capacity are impaired under cool or hot conditions compared with moderate conditions, suggesting that environmental temperature conditions play an important role for exercise performance.
Acute effects of heated resistance exercise in female and male power athletes
TLDR
Heated resistance exercise enhanced power and increased plasma hGH concentration in female and males power athletes, whereas differential changes occurred for cortisol and testosterone.
The influence of upper-body pre-cooling on repeated sprint performance in moderate ambient temperatures
TLDR
It is suggested that upper-body pre-cooling does not provide any benefit to intermittent sprinting exercise in a moderate environment, with no differences in the subjective ratings of perceived exertion.
Sprint performance under heat stress: A review
TLDR
Training and competition in major track‐and‐field events, and for many team or racquet sports, often require the completion of maximal sprints in hot ambient conditions, and strategies employed by "sprint" athletes to mitigate the negative influence of higher environmental temperatures are discussed.
Effects of heat exposure in the absence of hyperthermia on power output during repeated cycling sprints
TLDR
Power output at the onset of a cycling sprint during repeated cycling sprints is decreased due to heat exposure in the absence of hyperthermia.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 27 REFERENCES
The effect of heat exposure on performance of and recovery from high-intensity, intermittent exercise.
TLDR
The results of this study suggest that heat exposure may improve anaerobic performance but does not appear to affect the physiological responses during 60 min of recovery.
The Impact of heat exposure and repeated exercise on circulating stress hormones
TLDR
A differential response of the various stress hormones to heat exposure and repeated moderate exercise is indicated, with repetition of exercise in the heat increased circulatory and psychological stress.
Muscle metabolism during exercise and heat stress in trained men: effect of acclimation.
TLDR
The greater reliance on carbohydrate as a fuel source during exercise in the heat appears to be partially reduced after acclimation, which is consistent with the observed changes in plasma epinephrine concentrations.
Effect of heat stress on muscle energy metabolism during exercise.
TLDR
The results indicate that the rate of ATP utilization may be increased during exercise in the heat but that this increased energy demand is predominantly met by an increase in anaerobic glycolysis and creatine phosphate hydrolysis, preventing a reduction in total adenine nucleotide pool.
Skeletal muscle metabolism during exercise is influenced by heat acclimation.
TLDR
Assessment of skeletal muscle metabolism during submaximal exercise in 13 healthy men indicates that accumulation of muscle lactate is increased and aerobic metabolic rate is decreased during exercise in the heat before and after heat acclimation; increased muscle glycogen utilization does not account for the increased Muscle lactate accumulation during exercise under extreme heat stress.
A differential catecholamine response during prolonged exercise and passive heating.
TLDR
The heat load combined with the exercise task produced an increase in plasma NE concentration greater than the sum of the values measured during exercise in the thermoneutral environment and passive heating, suggesting that the combination of stressors caused an augmentation of the sympathetic nervous system's response.
Maximum leg force and power output during short-term dynamic exercise.
TLDR
Force exerted and power generated were measured during short-term exercise performed on a bicycle ergometer that had been modified by the addition of an electric motor driving the cranks at a chosen constant velocity to establish a parabolic function of crank velocity.
Measurement of work and power output using friction-loaded cycle ergometers.
  • H. Lakomy
  • Engineering, Medicine
    Ergonomics
  • 1986
TLDR
This study examines the possible error resulting from the assumption that the flywheel to be revolving at a constant speed and does not take into account the work required to accelerate it.
Effect of temperature on the contractile properties and muscle power of triceps surae in humans.
  • C. Davies, K. Young
  • Chemistry, Medicine
    Journal of applied physiology: respiratory, environmental and exercise physiology
  • 1983
TLDR
The results underline the importance of the contractile and force generating capacity of human muscle in determining maximal power output and performance during exercise of a few seconds duration.
Acclimization in a hot, humid environment: cardiovascular adjustments.
TLDR
The results indicated that central circulatory and temperature regulating events are not casually associated in acclimatization.
...
1
2
3
...