Human physiological adaptation to pregnancy: Inter‐ and intraspecific perspectives

@article{Rockwell2003HumanPA,
  title={Human physiological adaptation to pregnancy: Inter‐ and intraspecific perspectives},
  author={L. Christie Rockwell and Enrique Vargas and Lorna G. Moore},
  journal={American Journal of Human Biology},
  year={2003},
  volume={15}
}
Reproductive success requires successful maternal physiological adaptation to pregnancy. An interspecific perspective reveals that the human species has modified features of our haplorhine heritage affecting the uteroplacental circulation. We speculate that such modifications — including early implantation and deep, widespread invasion of fetal (trophoblast cells) into and resultant remodeling of maternal uterine vessels — are responses to or compensation for the biomechanical constraints… Expand
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