Human papillomavirus and cervical cancer

@article{Schiffman2007HumanPA,
  title={Human papillomavirus and cervical cancer},
  author={M. Schiffman and P. Castle and J. Jeronimo and A. Rodr{\'i}guez and S. Wacholder},
  journal={The Lancet},
  year={2007},
  volume={370},
  pages={890-907}
}
Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in women worldwide, and knowledge regarding its cause and pathogenesis is expanding rapidly. Persistent infection with one of about 15 genotypes of carcinogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) causes almost all cases. There are four major steps in cervical cancer development: infection of metaplastic epithelium at the cervical transformation zone, viral persistence, progression of persistently infected epithelium to cervical precancer, and invasion… Expand
[Human papillomavirus infection. Pathology and molecular pathology].
TLDR
The Ständige Impfkommission, the German standing committee on immunizations, has recommended the prophylactic use of vaccines against the two most frequent HR-HPV genotypes, HPV-16 and HPV-18, in women age 12-17 years before first sexual intercourse. Expand
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  • K. Hellner, K. Münger
  • Medicine
  • Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • 2011
TLDR
It has been estimated that there will be no measurable decline of HPV-associated cervical cancers before 2040, and therapeutic efforts to combat high-risk HPV- associated disease remain of critical importance. Expand
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TLDR
Studies are currently in progress to determine whether treatment of anal HSIL reduces the risk of cancer among HIV-infected men and women, and to define the molecular events associated with progression from HSIL to cancer. Expand
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TLDR
The very high negative predictive value of HPV testing speaks in favor of its use in screening of cervical cancer to reduce the mortality related to this neoplasia particularly in developing countries. Expand
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TLDR
Men and women with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection are at high risk of HPV-related malignancies and should be screened for cervical HSIL and cancer, and HIV-infected men and women should be considered for anal screening programs. Expand
Human papillomavirus and cervical cancer
TLDR
More sensitive than cytology, primary screening by human papillomavirus testing could enable screening intervals to be extended and if these prevention strategies can be implemented in developing countries, many thousands of lives could be saved. Expand
Prevention of Complications from Human Papillomavirus Infection in the HIV-Infected Individual
TLDR
Ongoing work to optimize screening for both cervical and anal HSIL to prevent cancer at these sites, as well as increasing uptake of prophylactic HPV vaccines, are currently the best options to decrease HPV-related complications in PLWH. Expand
Human papillomavirus induced Cervical and Oropharyngeal Cancers: From Mechanisms to Potential Immuno-Therapeutic Strategies.
TLDR
The mechanism of pathogenesis with current immunotherapeutic advances in regressing the NC and CC is deciphered, with an emphasis of immune-therapeutic strategies being tested in clinical trials and predominantly focus on defining the efficacy and limitations. Expand
Carcinogenic human papillomavirus infection
TLDR
HPV testing will probably replace cytology-based cervical screening owing to greater reassurance when the test is negative, however, the effective implementation of HPV vaccination and screening globally remains a challenge. Expand
Reprint of: Human papillomavirus infection and its role in the pathogenesis of anal cancer
TLDR
Studies are currently in progress to determine whether treatment of anal HSIL reduces the risk of cancer among HIV-infected men and women, and to define the molecular events associated with progression from HSIL to cancer. Expand
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