Human mitochondrial DNA variation and evolution: analysis of nucleotide sequences from seven individuals.

@article{Aquadro1983HumanMD,
  title={Human mitochondrial DNA variation and evolution: analysis of nucleotide sequences from seven individuals.},
  author={Charles F. Aquadro and Barry D. Greenberg},
  journal={Genetics},
  year={1983},
  volume={103 2},
  pages={
          287-312
        }
}
We have analyzed nucleotide sequence variation in an approximately 900-base pair region of the human mitochondrial DNA molecule encompassing the heavy strand origin of replication and the D-loop. Our analysis has focused on nucleotide sequences available from seven humans. Average nucleotide diversity among the sequences is 1.7%, several-fold higher than estimates from restriction endonuclease site variation in mtDNA from these individuals and previously reported for other humans. This… 

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