Corpus ID: 35288063

Human-mediated dispersal of emerald ash borer : Significance of the firewood pathway

@inproceedings{Robertson2009HumanmediatedDO,
  title={Human-mediated dispersal of emerald ash borer : Significance of the firewood pathway},
  author={D. R. Robertson and D. Andow},
  year={2009}
}
Introduction Invasive alien species can have devastating consequences on native biodiversity, ecosystem and evolutionary processes (Lovett et al. 2006, McNeely 2001, Mooney and Cleland 2001). In the United States alone, economic costs associated with environmental damages and losses as a result of invasive species have been estimated to total between $120-137 billion per year (Pimentel et al. 2005, Pimentel et al. 2000). Forest products are particularly affected with losses attributed to exotic… Expand

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