Human impacts and adaptations in the Caribbean Islands: an historical ecology approach

@article{Fitzpatrick2007HumanIA,
  title={Human impacts and adaptations in the Caribbean Islands: an historical ecology approach},
  author={Scott M. Fitzpatrick and William F. Keegan},
  journal={Earth and Environmental Science Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh},
  year={2007},
  volume={98},
  pages={29 - 45}
}
ABSTRACT Archaeological investigations demonstrate that peoples first settled the Caribbean islands approximately 6000–7000 years ago. At least four major, and multiple minor, migrations took place over the next millennia by peoples from Mesoamerica and South America who practised various subsistence strategies and had different levels of technology. For decades, researchers have been interested in investigating how these groups adapted to and impacted insular environments through time. This… Expand
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