Human genome: Patchwork people

@article{Check2005HumanGP,
  title={Human genome: Patchwork people},
  author={Erika Check},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2005},
  volume={437},
  pages={1084-1086}
}
  • E. Check
  • Published 20 October 2005
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Nature
For years it was assumed that tiny differences in our genetic make-up gave us our individual traits. Now it seems that those characteristics are caused by rearrangements of large chunks of our DNA — variations that could be the key to understanding disease. Erika Check investigates.We are all individualsOver 99% of human DNA sequences are the same across the population. But the other 1% includes variations that have a major influence on our response to disease, drugs and even food. Speak not of… 
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