• Corpus ID: 7843031

Human dermatosis caused by vesicating beetle products (Insecta), cantharidin and paederin: An overview

@inproceedings{Ghoneim2013HumanDC,
  title={Human dermatosis caused by vesicating beetle products (Insecta), cantharidin and paederin: An overview},
  author={Karem S. Ghoneim},
  year={2013}
}
Three major families in the order Coleoptera have been found to produce vesicant toxins, Meloidae (true blister beetles) and Oedemeridae (false blister beetles) produce cantharidin and Staphylinidae (rove beetles) produce paederin. Some of the most important distribution, biological and ecological aspects of these beetle families had been studied because of their products cause human dermatitis. The detection, biosynthesis and chemistry of both cantharidin and paederin were discussed. The… 
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TLDR
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TLDR
The presence of paederus dermatitis in Cameroon is confirmed, mainly localized in the unusual geoclimatic region of the western high mountains within the country, as well as the usual warm, moist areas of Yaounde.
224-236 Zuharah WF.pmd
Rove beetle (Paederus spp.) is of medical interest because it causes nasty skin lesion in humans known as Paederus dermatitis. In addition, Paederus is gaining notoriety as urban pests in
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TLDR
Paederus dermatitis is a condition that is more common in tropical areas to be evoked in travelers during stays or after returning from these areas and the circumstances of appearance of lesions, their clinical appearance and especially the identification of the insect makes it possible to make the diagnosis and subsequently to ensure the proper management.
ISOLATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF THE BACTERIAL COMMUNITY ASSOCIATED WITH THE ROVE BEETLE, Paederus fuscipes CURTIS (COLEOPTERA: STAPHYLINIDAE)
TLDR
It is demonstrated that a large diversity of bacterial community has been isolated from both male and female P. fuscipes, however P. aeruginosa colonies were frequently detected in females compared to male beetles, and can be used in future studies to investigate the possible impact of these bacterial counts on the concentration of paederin produced in P. Fuscipes.
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TLDR
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