Human Nature in Economic Theory

@article{TugwellHumanNI,
  title={Human Nature in Economic Theory},
  author={Rexford Guy Tugwell},
  journal={Journal of Political Economy},
  volume={30},
  pages={317 - 345}
}
  • R. G. Tugwell
  • Published 1 June 1922
  • Psychology
  • Journal of Political Economy
One criticism brought against conscious economic theory is that it fails to take advised and realistic account of human nature. Economics is admitted to have a conception of human nature; but the root of the trouble seems to lie exactly in the fact that it is a conception-or, perhaps more accurately, a preconception. Its critics feel it to be inexact, unreal and without documentation or careful description; advanced, possibly, a step beyond the rigid classical homo economicus in the thinking of… 
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