Human Limits for Hypoxia: The Physiological Challenge of Climbing Mt. Everest

@article{West2000HumanLF,
  title={Human Limits for Hypoxia: The Physiological Challenge of Climbing Mt. Everest},
  author={John B West},
  journal={Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences},
  year={2000},
  volume={899}
}
  • J. West
  • Published 2000
  • Medicine
  • Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Abstract: Climbing Mt. Everest without supplementary oxygen presents a fascinating physiological challenge because, at the summit, humans are very near the limit of tolerance to hypoxia. It was not until 1978 that the feat was accomplished, and this was after many unsuccessful attempts over a period of more than 50 years, and several physiological studies that suggested that it would be impossible. An analysis shows that the critical factors for reaching the summit are the enormous… Expand
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