Human Immunosenescence

@article{Pawelec2006HumanI,
  title={Human Immunosenescence},
  author={G. Pawelec and S. Koch and C. Franceschi and A. Wikby},
  journal={Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences},
  year={2006},
  volume={1067}
}
Abstract:  The rate of acceleration of the frequency of death due to cardiovascular disease or cancer increases with age from middle age up to around 75–80 years, plateauing thereafter. Mortality due to infectious disease, however, does not plateau, but continues to accelerate indefinitely. The elderly are particularly susceptible to novel infectious agents such as SARS, as well as to previously encountered pathogens. Why is this? The elderly commonly possess oligoclonal expansions of T cells… Expand
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