Human Health Risk on Environmental Exposure to Bisphenol-A: A Review

@article{Tsai2006HumanHR,
  title={Human Health Risk on Environmental Exposure to Bisphenol-A: A Review},
  author={Wen-Tien Tsai},
  journal={Journal of Environmental Science and Health, Part C},
  year={2006},
  volume={24},
  pages={225 - 255}
}
  • W. Tsai
  • Published 1 December 2006
  • Environmental Science
  • Journal of Environmental Science and Health, Part C
Bisphenol-A (BPA), identified as an environmental hormone (i.e., endocrine disruptor), is an industrially important chemical that is being used as a primary raw material for the production of engineering plastics (e.g., polycarbonate/epoxy resins), food cans (i.e., lacquer coatings), and dental composites/sealants. From the ecotoxicology, human health and regulatory points of view, it is urgent to restrict the emissions and releases of the estrogenic chemical from the industrial processes and… 
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Abstract Bisphenol A (BPA) is an endocrine disruptor widely used in the production of polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins. Exposures to BPA have been associated with reproductive, developmental,
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