Human Health Effects From Chronic Arsenic Poisoning–A Review

@article{Kapaj2006HumanHE,
  title={Human Health Effects From Chronic Arsenic Poisoning–A Review},
  author={Simon Kapaj and Hans J. Peterson and Karsten Liber and Prosun Bhattacharya},
  journal={Journal of Environmental Science and Health, Part A},
  year={2006},
  volume={41},
  pages={2399 - 2428}
}
The ill effects of human exposure to arsenic (As) have recently been reevaluated by government agencies around the world. This has lead to a lowering of As guidelines in drinking water, with Canada decreasing the maximum allowable level from 50 to 25 μg/L and the U.S. from 50 to 10 μg/L. Canada is currently contemplating a further decrease to 5 μg/L. The reason for these regulatory changes is the realization that As can cause deleterious effects at lower concentrations than was previously… 
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