Human African trypanosomiasis

@article{Brun2010HumanAT,
  title={Human African trypanosomiasis},
  author={Reto Brun and Johannes A. Blum and François Chappuis and Christian Burri},
  journal={The Lancet},
  year={2010},
  volume={375},
  pages={148-159}
}
Human African trypanosomiasis.
Human African trypanosomiasis.
  • R. Brun, J. Blum
  • Medicine
    Infectious disease clinics of North America
  • 2012
Human African trypanosomiasis in endemic populations and travellers
TLDR
The symptomatology of travellers is markedly different from the usual textbook descriptions of African HAT patients and a promising new drug combination is currently evaluated in a phase 3 b study and further new drugs are under evaluation.
Human African Trypanosomiasis: A Highly Neglected Neurological Disease
TLDR
The recent decline in the number of reported new HAT cases should not foster further neglect of this highly neglected nervous system infection, and stage biomarkers and safer therapy are urgently needed.
[Sleeping sickness: end of the epidemic outbreak?].
Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT)
TLDR
Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) found only in sub-Saharan Africa is caused by the parasite Trypanosoma brucei which is transmitted by tsetse flies, and two strategies are used for the reduction or interruption of HAT transmission: elimination of the parasite reservoir and vector control.
Clinical and Neuropathogenetic Aspects of Human African Trypanosomiasis
TLDR
Clinical features of HAT are diverse and non-specific with early-stage symptoms common to several infections endemic within sub-Saharan Africa which may result in a delayed or mistaken diagnosis and further research is required to develop better diagnostic and staging techniques and safer more efficacious drug regimens.
Human African trypanosomiasis in non-endemic countries (2000-2010).
TLDR
Centralized distribution of drugs for HAT by WHO enables an HAT surveillance system for non-DECs to be maintained and provides valuable information on disease transmission and complements data collected in DECs.
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References

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Human African trypanosomiasis in endemic populations and travellers
TLDR
The symptomatology of travellers is markedly different from the usual textbook descriptions of African HAT patients and a promising new drug combination is currently evaluated in a phase 3 b study and further new drugs are under evaluation.
Biological diagnosis of human African trypanosomiasis
TLDR
Human African trypanosomiasis or sleeping sickness is an endemic disease in many sub-Saharan countries, and the more chronic “Gambian” form, which evolves fatally over a period of several months or years, predominates in West and Central Africa.
Human African trypanosomiasis: an emerging public health crisis.
TLDR
To limit the human impact in some of the poorest communities in Africa, endemic countries will require external support to implement strategies for disease control, and donor agencies, NGOs and mission organisations could play an important role in supporting control efforts.
Human African trypanosomiasis–neurological aspects
TLDR
There is a pressing need for a non–toxic oral drug for both early and late stage disease that would obviate many of the problems of staging, and various possible strategies to achieve this goal are currently underway.
NECT Is Next: Implementing the New Drug Combination Therapy for Trypanosoma brucei gambiense Sleeping Sickness
TLDR
NECT stands as the most promising first-line treatment for second-stage T. gambiense HAT, based on the high efficacy and good safety profile observed in all studies done to date, against a background of recognized severity of stage 2 disease and toxicity of existing treatments.
Human African Trypanosomiasis in Areas without Surveillance
TLDR
The above-listed examples illustrate that many HAT patients are still found in historical foci that have been devoid of active surveillance for years or decades because of their remoteness, insecurity, neglect, or a combination of these factors.
The Burden of Human African Trypanosomiasis
TLDR
This work highlights areas where data are lacking to properly quantify the impact of these diseases, mainly relating to quantifying under-reporting and disability associated with infection, and challenges the HAT research community to tackle the neglect in data gathering to enable better evidence-based assessments of burden.
African trypanosomiasis: New insights for disease control
TLDR
The special issue turns its attention to recent developments in experimental work in African trypanosomiaisis with a direct bearing on disease control.
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