Human–like, population–level specialization in the manufacture of pandanus tools by New Caledonian crows Corvus moneduloides

@article{Hunt2000HumanlikePS,
  title={Human–like, population–level specialization in the manufacture of pandanus tools by New Caledonian crows Corvus moneduloides},
  author={Gavin R. Hunt},
  journal={Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences},
  year={2000},
  volume={267},
  pages={403 - 413}
}
  • G. Hunt
  • Published 22 February 2000
  • Biology
  • Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences
The main way of gaining insight into the behaviour and neurological faculties of our early ancestors is to study artefactual evidence for the making and use of tools, but this places severe constraints on what knowledge can be obtained. New Caledonian crows, however, offer a potential analogous model system for learning about these difficult-to-establish aspects of prehistoric humans. I found new evidence of human-like specialization in crows' manufacture of hook tools from pandanus leaves… 

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