Hox Proteins: Sculpting Body Parts by Activating Localized Cell Death

@article{Alonso2002HoxPS,
  title={Hox Proteins: Sculpting Body Parts by Activating Localized Cell Death},
  author={Claudio R. Alonso},
  journal={Current Biology},
  year={2002},
  volume={12},
  pages={R776-R778}
}
  • C. Alonso
  • Published 19 November 2002
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Current Biology
Hox proteins shape animal structures by eliciting different developmental programs along the anteroposterior body axis. A recent study reveals that the Drosophila Hox protein Deformed directly activates the cell-death-promoting gene reaper to maintain the boundaries between distinct head segments. 

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