How women living with HIV react and respond to learning about Canadian law that criminalises HIV non-disclosure: ‘how do you prove that you told?’

@article{Greene2019HowWL,
  title={How women living with HIV react and respond to learning about Canadian law that criminalises HIV non-disclosure: ‘how do you prove that you told?’},
  author={S. Greene and Apondi J Odhiambo and M. Muchenje and A. Symington and Jasmine Cotnam and Kristin Dunn and Margaret Frank and Shelly Glum and Rebecca Gormley and A. Ion and V. Nicholson and K. Shore and A. Kaida},
  journal={Culture, Health & Sexuality},
  year={2019},
  volume={21},
  pages={1087 - 1102}
}
Abstract The Women, ART and the Criminalization of HIV Study is a qualitative, arts-based research study focusing on the impact of the HIV non-disclosure law on women living with HIV in Canada. The federal law requires people living with HIV to disclose their HIV-positive status to sexual partners before engaging in sexual activities that pose what the Supreme Court of Canada called a ‘realistic possibility of transmission’. Drawing on findings from seven education and discussion sessions with… Expand
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