How we treat chronic active Epstein–Barr virus infection

@article{Sawada2017HowWT,
  title={How we treat chronic active Epstein–Barr virus infection},
  author={A. Sawada and M. Inoue and K. Kawa},
  journal={International Journal of Hematology},
  year={2017},
  volume={105},
  pages={406-418}
}
Chronic active Epstein–Barr virus infection (CAEBV) is a prototype of the EBV-associated T- or NK-cell lymphoproliferative diseases, which also include hypersensitivity to mosquito bites and severe-type hydroavacciniforme. The manifestations of CAEBV are often self-limiting with minimum supportive care or only prednisolone and cyclosporine A with or without etoposide. However, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the only cure, without which patients with CAEBV die… Expand
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