How useful is executive control training? Age differences in near and far transfer of task-switching training.

@article{Karbach2009HowUI,
  title={How useful is executive control training? Age differences in near and far transfer of task-switching training.},
  author={Julia Karbach and Jutta Kray},
  journal={Developmental science},
  year={2009},
  volume={12 6},
  pages={
          978-90
        }
}
Although executive functions can be improved by training, little is known about the extent to which these training-related benefits can be transferred to other tasks, or whether this transfer can be modulated by the type of training. This study investigated lifespan changes in near transfer of task-switching training to structurally similar tasks and its modulation by verbal self-instructions and variable training, as well as far transfer to structurally dissimilar 'executive' tasks and fluid… Expand

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