How to survive the medical misinformation mess

@article{Ioannidis2017HowTS,
  title={How to survive the medical misinformation mess},
  author={John P. A. Ioannidis and Michael E. Stuart and Shannon Brownlee and Sheri A. Strite},
  journal={European Journal of Clinical Investigation},
  year={2017},
  volume={47}
}
Most physicians and other healthcare professionals are unaware of the pervasiveness of poor quality clinical evidence that contributes considerably to overuse, underuse, avoidable adverse events, missed opportunities for right care and wasted healthcare resources. The Medical Misinformation Mess comprises four key problems. First, much published medical research is not reliable or is of uncertain reliability, offers no benefit to patients, or is not useful to decision makers. Second, most… 
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