How to regulate emotion? Neural networks for reappraisal and distraction.

@article{Kanske2011HowTR,
  title={How to regulate emotion? Neural networks for reappraisal and distraction.},
  author={Philipp Kanske and Janine Heissler and Sandra Sch{\"o}nfelder and Andr{\'e} Bongers and Mich{\`e}le Wessa},
  journal={Cerebral cortex},
  year={2011},
  volume={21 6},
  pages={
          1379-88
        }
}
The regulation of emotion is vital for adaptive behavior in a social environment. Different strategies may be adopted to achieve successful emotion regulation, ranging from attentional control (e.g., distraction) to cognitive change (e.g., reappraisal). However, there is only scarce evidence comparing the different regulation strategies with respect to their neural mechanisms and their effects on emotional experience. We, therefore, directly compared reappraisal and distraction in a functional… 

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