How to name new chemical elements (IUPAC Recommendations 2016)

@article{Koppenol2016HowTN,
  title={How to name new chemical elements (IUPAC Recommendations 2016)},
  author={Willem H. Koppenol and John Corish and Javier Garc{\'i}a‐Mart{\'i}nez and Juris Meija and Jan Reedijk},
  journal={Pure and Applied Chemistry},
  year={2016},
  volume={88},
  pages={401 - 405}
}
Abstract A procedure is proposed to name new chemical elements. After the discovery of a new element is established by the joint IUPAC-IUPAP Working Group, the discoverers are invited to propose a name and a symbol to the IUPAC Inorganic Chemistry Division. Elements can be named after a mythological concept, a mineral, a place or country, a property or a scientist. After examination and acceptance by the Inorganic Chemistry Division, the proposal follows the accepted IUPAC procedure and is then… 
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