How to integrate dreaming into a general theory of consciousness—A critical review of existing positions and suggestions for future research

@article{Windt2011HowTI,
  title={How to integrate dreaming into a general theory of consciousness—A critical review of existing positions and suggestions for future research},
  author={Jennifer M. Windt and Valdas Noreika},
  journal={Consciousness and Cognition},
  year={2011},
  volume={20},
  pages={1091-1107}
}
  • J. Windt, V. Noreika
  • Published 1 December 2011
  • Medicine, Psychology
  • Consciousness and Cognition
In this paper, we address the different ways in which dream research can contribute to interdisciplinary consciousness research. As a second global state of consciousness aside from wakefulness, dreaming is an important contrast condition for theories of waking consciousness. However, programmatic suggestions for integrating dreaming into broader theories of consciousness, for instance by regarding dreams as a model system of standard or pathological wake states, have not yielded… Expand
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